While it’s true that people of almost any age can play and enjoy golf, there is a common misconception that a game that appeals to retirees and teenagers alike isnt physically demanding.

And although golfers don’t have to worry about the kinds of injuries and stress of a football or rugby player, there is still quite a bit of physicality associated with the game that many people tend to underestimate.

Without proper strength and endurance training, it is still very possible to sustain injuries on the golf course, no matter the golfer’s age. Here are a few exercises aimed at increasing strength, flexibility and overall fitness levels as well as reducing the potential risk of injury on the green.

Seated Rotations

These should be done alternating sides, ten to a side to improve rotational mobility, a fundamental part of a golfer’s swing.

To do seated rotations, sit with your legs on either side of a bench. A golf club should be held behind the back so it sits in the crook of the elbows. Palms should be flat against the stomach to maintain posture. Rotate the torso to the right and keep the position for two to three seconds. Return to the frontal position and repeat the movement to the left side.

Handwalks

Handwalks should be familiar to most people and are a low intensity way to reduce the risk of “golfer’s elbow” as well as potential shoulder injuries.

From a standing position, bend forward from the waist until the hands are on the ground in front of you. Keeping the knees as straight as possible, walk the hands out until your body is parallel to the floor and in a pushup position. Finally, still maintaining good posture and straight knees, walk the toes toward the hands. Repeat five to ten reps for the best results.

90/90 Stretch

This exercise is ideal for stretching the shoulders, giving your upper body more flexibility and range of motion.

To begin the 90/90 stretch, lie on the ground on one side, keeping the bottom leg extended straight out while the top leg is bent with the inside of the knee touching the ground. Rotating the upper body back, the objective is to touch the ground with the top shoulder blade. Once that position is achieved (or once you get as close to it as possible), hold for two to three seconds before repeating. Switch sides after five to ten reps.